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School Leadership

Turn Up the Heat

 April 20, 2018

By  Principal Tribe Editor

What does it mean to turn up the heat? What does it mean to promote growth on campus? In this article, Kyle McClure discusses six ways to be a catalyst for growth:

  1. Relationships Come First
  2. Visibility Matters
  3. How to Raise the Heat
  4. Leading with Questions
  5. Positive Peer Pressure
  6. Observation

Leadership is inherently about change. CEOs won’t last long if there is no push for new or better, no politician runs on a platform of the status quo, and school leaders don’t keep master binders of the lesson plans used each year. Leaders who fail to seek positive change are, simply, not leaders, they are managers. We must all be change agents; for our students, our staff, and each other.

My position as district technology integration specialist holds no real leadership capacity. Quite literally, there are no branches below my name on our organizational chart, and I have no students to guide through the year. Thankfully, my efforts to push the status quo are supported by excellent district administrators, who support our teacher leaders in doing the same.

Last year, my first year on the job, I planned to affect positive change as an instructional partner, technology coach and trusted colleague. While this was effective to some extent, I came to realize that I was tossing ideas into the wind, hoping that they would stick to a teacher who would bring the idea to fruition. I needed to “raise the heat” in order to create positive change. “Raise the heat” is a concept I learned at the Kansas Leadership Center last spring with fellow administrators and teacher leaders. It means to apply pressure that causes a desire to change.

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About the author

Principal Tribe Editor

Principal Tribe is connecting and amplifying the voices of principals and school leaders. Focusing on school leadership, educational research, and learning.

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